Tag Archives: food

Easier said than done.

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Health tips are happening on my Facebook page lately.  It’s just evolving in that direction.  Yesterday’s was the following:

“Eat when you’re hungry.  Don’t eat when you’re not.”

Yeah, groundbreaking stuff, there. I could almost hear the collective muttering, “duh” in a hushed exhale.

I concede that it’s not news.  It’s not avant garde.  It’s not the latest scientific breakthrough.

In my defense, however, chances are mighty, mighty good that you’re not following this old, ratty advice.  Chances are pretty good that you are probably trying to find ways to eat less than you are actually hungry for a lot of the time and eating way past that full signal other times.  How do I know that?  What, am I made of stone?  These things I speak of are things with which I am familiar, my friends.

Of course, in some part of your mind, or maybe a lot of your mind, you think that you can’t follow this little “rule” because there’s something quite wrong with you.  I mean, really, it’s so easy a kid could do it.  And before we cram crazy messages into their tender brains, they all do.

So if you can’t do it, what’s wrong with you?

Nothing.  Absolutely nothing.  That’s right.  There’s nothing wrong with you.

There is probably something wrong with the nourishment that you are receiving though.  I’ll bet a shiny new quarter on it, actually.

Here are the reasons that I think following this most obvious and simple guideline is so difficult:

1.  We’re told that the body is not to be trusted.  We get this message from early on from everywhere.  So, when it’s 10:30 on a Tuesday morning and you’re still not hungry but stuff down some breakfast because you’ve been told that “it’s the most important meal of the day” or it’s 8:15 on a Monday night and your stomach is growling but you ignore it because “you’re not supposed to eat past 7”, you do this because you don’t trust your body.

2.  You are malnourished.  You will continue to eat until you get the nutrients that you need, not the calories that you need.  This is a crucial distinction.  We’ve shifted in the past 100 years to the caloric model of eating.  You can eat a pint or more of low-fat ice cream during a commercial break.  Just TRY and eat that much liver.  And if liver is gross to you, you can change that to steak.  Your body wants nutrients first and foremost.  You understand this.  A tablespoon of white sugar is not the same thing as a tablespoon of just about anything else.  The calories may be the same but the drive to eat more will not be sated with the sugar.  There are no nutrients.  None.  And worse, foods such as sugar and white flour actually use up your stores of other nutrients to digest.  So, you’re not getting “no nutrition”, you’re getting “negative nutrition”.  And what do you need?  Positive nutrition in order to feel full, good, and healthy.

3.  Malnutrition is not just a matter of food.  If you feel agitated, you may need to go for a walk or punch a pillow.  Cake will not allow the emotion to move through.  Cake will numb it and repress it and that can feel helpful at times, but the agitation is still there, just buried under cake.  The starvation you feel when loneliness overtakes you?  French fries really don’t give a flip about your struggles.  Friends do.  The craving you have for affection will not be met by squirting the whole can of whipped cream in your mouth.  This cycle only creates more agitation, more loneliness, more cravings for human touch.  In the same way negative nutrition creates deeper and deeper deficits, using food to do something it’s not meant to do, creates deeper and deeper emotional deficits.

4.  Portion prescriptions.  Once you are able to connect with your hunger, portions are the stupidest thing EVER.  There are days when I eat 5 snacks a day.  None are big enough to be called a meal.  Others, I eat the traditional 3 squares.  Some, I eat one big meal with a steak so big it can’t fit on the plate.  Once in a long while, I only want a smoothie for the whole day. Portions as mandated from the heavens assume that you are the same, day in, day out.  They assume that your level of activity is identical every day.  They assume that your hormones never fluctuate.  They assume that you at 18 is the same as you at 45.  Yes, I know there are “formulas” that allow for variance, but, really? Formulas?  How hungry are you today?  Well, eat.  If you’re not, don’t.  You don’t have to eat 5 meals a day if you’re not hungry five times a day.

I could probably go on and on but this will dissolve into a rant instead of something useful REAL quick, so I’ll stop there.  In short, eat when you’re hungry.  Don’t eat when you’re not.  Basically, Nourish yourself into Freedom.

If you haven’t joined us for #30daymove, yet, it’s not too late.  Never too late!

Recipe: Preserved Lemons

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This is the most highly anticipated recipe that you didn’t even realize that you couldn’t live without.  You only thought that your kitchen was well stocked and that all your other recipes were doing just fine.  This little addition is kitchen gold, I tell you, gold!

 

Preserved Lemons a.k.a. Sunshine in a Jar of Yumminess

What you’ll need:

A very clean glass jar with lid

A tamper downer (and yes, that is the correct technical terminology)  (not really)

Lemons

Sea salt

A sharp knife

Time

The return on this investment is unreal by the way.  I’m not sure how much more I can gush over these, really.  I buy the lemons when they go on sale.  They’re usually on sale because they’re about to be over ripe.  In other words, you’re going to take the lemons that life hands you, add salt and preserve them to make something even better than lemonade.

Okey dokey (there’s a lot of preamble because the recipe is overly simple).

1. Cut your lemons into quarters or eighths.

2. Put lemons in jar.  (I do this every two lemons because the rhythm seems right.)

3. Put a pinch of sea salt in the jar.  

4.  Tamp down releasing all the juices.

5.  Repeat this process until your jar is full.

6.  Close jar.

7. Wait.

I wait anywhere from 3-14 days.  The longer this sits, the better it gets.

The one thing you want to watch is that at the top of the jar, the lemons are completely immersed in their juices to keep air from getting to the flesh.  

These are good chopped into just about anything.  They are unbelievable with merguez and green salads.  The juice can be used just like you’d use fresh.  Just adjust for the salt.

Enjoy!  Nourish yourself into Freedom.

Rosemary Infused Pork Kabobs with Apple Sauerkraut Slaw

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The irony of writing a recipe by someone who can’t follow one is not lost on me!

This was super delicious and wanted to share with you.  It was dinner (and lunch!) last week.

It’s super simple!

Rosemary Pork Kabobs and Apple/Sauerkraut Slaw (pictured with grated beet and homemade mayo salad)

Here’s what you’ll need per person:

For the pork:

1 Thick cut boneless pork chop, cubed into a little larger than bite-size

1 rosemary branch to use as a skewer (leaves still on), soaked in water

1 tspn of bacon grease leftover from the rest of the pig  🙂

Marinade:

juice of one lemon

garlic clove, minced

You’ll also need black sesame seeds to coat

For the slaw:

1/2 crisp apple, diced

2-3 Tbspns of sauerkraut, chopped

1/2-1 Tbspn of whole grain mustard

1. Prepare the slaw by mixing the three ingredients and set aside.

2. With a fork, prick the cubed meat in several places to tenderize and open up some little tunnels for the marinade to sink in.

3. Place the meat into the marinade and coat evenly.

The longer this can sit the better, but even at 10 minutes this works nicely.

4. Preheat the oven to 375.

5. Take the meat out of the marinade and massage bacon grease into it.

6. Roll the cubes in sesame seeds.

7. Skewer the meat onto the soaked rosemary, leaving about 1/4 inch between each piece.

8. Salt to taste.  

9. Place the skewers onto a baking sheet with some sides or else you’ll lose all the sauce and that would suck.

10. Let it roast until done (15-20 minutes).  Or more if you want them to be crispier.

11. Remove from the oven and plate with the pan juices.

12. Cover them in the slaw and pig out.